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Archive for April, 2010

Article – Truth about Sulphites

April 26th, 2010

I am trapped in a concrete wall with a tiny window, as I stare out into the sunshine. It is not a cell per say, but the office in the warehouse. I am focused on writing an article, but I can hear the swish of a golf club or the clink of a glass at a barbeque somewhere in the back of my mind. I am tired after a very busy week, yet cannot wait for the weekend to start. Oh tortured soul, give me peace from this magnetic sun. I signed up for Saturdays when I left the bright lights of Engineering for the dark shade of the vines. Summer is coming though, and I will look forward to my next trip to visit my winemakers in their little piece of paradise, while Tipperary embraces the summer downpour. One of the things that made this week so busy was the visit to Clonmel of one of my best winemakers. Samuel Guibert, of Mas de Daumas Gassac enthralled over 40 people in Nuala Hickey’s packed Cafe in the Westgate last Wednesday night. I may have mentioned he was coming a few times over the last few weeks. For those of you who missed it, it was a very special evening and Samuel charmed all concerned, especially the ladies. The night was a great success and photos and videos from the night can be seen on the blog – www.rednosewine.com/blog

There is a distinct difference between a tasting with a winemaker and someone who sells wine. The passion and the commitment to quality wine shines through, and as an added bonus, you might get answers to the questions that you have wanted to ask for a long time. The Clonmel audience definitely took advantage of their opportunity. Samuel answered questions on all manner of subjects from the truth behind sulphites, to the reason why sometimes, a white wine can be a little fizzy. All of these questions were asked by a very attentive audience in a very interactive tasting. The wines weren’t half bad either, in fact they are among the best reviewed wines in the world. For this week’s article, I will share some of the questions asked and Samuel’s very precise answers.

One of the topics that I get asked about a lot concerns sulphites. Every wine has to display on the bottle that they contain sulphites, even if it is minuscule amounts or buckets of the stuff. Mr. Guibert told us that there are recommended doses for sulphur dioxide, which acts as an anti oxidant and a preservative. You can’t taste it in the wine, which is why it works better than other anti-oxidants. Samuel told us about the ancient technique of using honey, which worked, but changed the taste of the wine dramatically. The next time you are down at your local farmer’s market, buy some honey and mix it with wine. However, don’t expect to like it. Another advantage of sulphur dioxide is that for every year the wine ages, the traces disappear two fold. However, the biggest insight we received was the scope with which the winemaker has to limit his sulphur usage. If you have limited production, you can constantly monitor and check your wine vats. A factory or supermarket wine is like a brewery and they are often forced to err on the side of caution, i.e. pour in the maximum Sulphur dioxide, just in case. The artisan winemaker can check his wine, as Samuel and his brothers do, many time each day, therefore controlling the usage. Samuel claimed that Gassac use very little ( as up to 10 -20 times less ) when compared to large scale producers, but then good wines don’t have to use it as much – the natural preservatives in the fruit shine through. The many people from the tasting who called in the next day to collect their wine without any trace of a hangover were testament to the negligible amount that Gassac use. One of the members of the group cheekily suggested that Samuel tasted his wine 20 times a day ( he checks it that often ), and was seldom sober. However, he confirmed something I have long been preaching – it is all in the nose. No need to taste every hour. He told us that 80% of tasting is in the nose, and the palate just confirms. When I am picking new wines, I nearly always know if I will reject a wine by smelling it. I don’t know if I will accept it as a buy, as you don’t get the length of the wine from the nose.

A very good question was asked by a certain teacher ( not Mrs. Red Nose ). It came on the back of Samuel’s description of the Viognier grape holding more than average residual sugar, and by that I mean more than Sauvignon Blanc. This means it is not dry, but off dry, and has wonderful honey undertones. Their Faune white wine for 12 Euros was possibly the star of the night, outside the Grand Cru wines. The simple description of fermentation is yeasts eating the natural sugar in the grapes and converting them to alcohol, thus converting grapes to wine. With bone dry wines, there is no more ( or negligible amounts ) of sugar to convert, but with sweeter wines, the chances are that it might start fermenting again – for example, if it is exposed to natural yeasts, such as exist in the atmosphere. What happens in effect is the wines become slightly fizzy as the fermentation happens in the bottle. Have you ever opened a white wine and had a light fizz from it. Now you know the reason why, and for the most part, is not supposed to happen. The most obvious wine where it is supposed to happen is Champagne. They have very special bottles and corks to control the power and the process takes much longer. If you ask for a still white wine in a restaurant and find it fizzes a little, send it back. The better winemakers, like Samuel, control the sweeter wines and the conditions they are stored, aged and bottled in.

There were many other questions asked and answered, and I am sure Samuel could have spoken all night. If there are specific questions you have, please send them in to me and I will answer them, or if you prefer, put the question to some of my winemakers. The truth is always easier to swallow coming from the people on the front line. There is a distinct air of summer barbeque about, so until our next wine makers visit, I bid you adieu.

Don’t forget to log onto the blog at www.rednosewine.com/blog or follow the ranting on Twitter – www.twitter.com/rednosewine

For anyone who would like more information and can’t make it into the shop, please feel free to contact me at info@rednosewine.com

“Life is much too short to drink bad wine”

Red Nose Wine Article - Nationalist Apr 22 2010

Article – Viva L-Espagna

April 19th, 2010

I sat down yesterday to write this article, but I could not. The reason is golf, or to be more accurate, the Careys Golf Society trip to Mount Juliet. As I sat at my desk on Saturday, the day after the trip, I stared blankly at the screen and waited for the words to pour out. Unfortunately I could not hear them for the pounding in my head and the strange noises echoing in my stomach. Arthur Guinness, you are no friend of mine. It’s been a long time since I had a hangover ( good wine gives you strength ), but this one was a humdinger, or as Bob Dylan might say, a folksinger. All I could manage was a lazy blog entry with photos from the day and a very funny video of Robin Williams describing how the Scots invented golf. Have a look at www.rednosewine.com/blog if you are bored enough to hear about my great birdie on the 10th. Much thanks to Mr. O Flaherty for his very accurate club choice. Anyway, onto the wine.

To be honest, I am still trying to figure out what to write about as I type this. The inspiration will arrive any minute now. Hear it comes, and we will talk about…Spain. Where did this choice come from? At some stage in the post golf celebrations in Careys, my brother in law Kevin showed me a photograph of himself and tennis superstar Raphael Nadal on his phone. He met him in the Chicago airport on a recent business trip. I am glad to confirm that by all accounts he was a gentleman and very happy to chat. It’s nice when famous people are friendly. To add to the Hello magazine moment, on the connecting flight from London to Cork, Denis Leamy sat down beside him and they talked rugby all the way home. I doubt they discussed Spanish wine, but I will make amends for them both. I work with a great Spanish importer who has much of the same beliefs as I do for quality winemaking. You won’t see the big brand wines on show with Raphael and Alvaro ( they are Spanish themselves ), but you will see the superstar winemakers that are lauded in Spain and all over the world. Their stable, and consequently mine, include Telmo Rodriguez, Alvaro Palacios, Emilio Moro and Martin Codex, among others. Pick up a wine magazine or browse any website on Spanish wine and these names are regularly featured.

Kevin & Nadal

Kevin & Nadal

For many of us, myself included for a long time, when someone mentioned Spanish wine, we thought of Rioja. This rich, oaky wine made from the Tempranillo grape has long been an Irish favourite. My wife raved about it as a student when she trekked through northern Spain on the Camino de Santiago de Compostela, the ancient pilgrim walk in the footsteps of Saint James. They would arrive onto small villages and less than a euro would buy them a jug of local heaven. These wines rarely leave their village and it is big brands that definitely lead the way in the market place. However, I would always think you need to be conscious of the price quality ratio with Rioja. Just as with Cotes du Rhone, there is a lot of rubbish out there. There are different types of Rioja, depending on your penchant for oak. Classic or basic Rioja will have less than a year in oak. Crianza will have at least 2 years ageing, 12 months of this in oak. Reserva should have 3 years ageing, and again at least 1 year in oak. The Grand Reserva wines have 2 years in oak. The more the oak, in general the more power you need to tame. Decanting is a must for the longer wines, and that rich chocolate style is most pronounced, albeit after several hours open, in these monsters. You really need food with the bigger wines and decanting is a necessity. There are some modern winemakers, Telmo Rodriguez included, who are abandoning the traditional rules and classifying complex and serious wines as basic Rioja, allowing them to do what they want and in terms of oaking. His Lanzaga wine, which has long been popular in Red Nose Wine, is a perfect example of this. This is very complex and beats most Grand Reserva wines on the quality front, but is only classified as a basic Rioja. There has been some movement to bring the Reserva wines down to affordable levels, and we were delighted to come across the very drinkable Baron de Ley Reserva for only 16.50 Euros. This is an absolute steal for a wine of such quality, and it has awards coming out of its proverbial cork.

Kevin & Denis Leamy

Kevin & Denis Leamy and some strange hypnotic woman in the seat behind

There are other regions and grape varieties in Spain other than Rioja and its famous grape, Tempranillo. Among them are the gorgeous whites made from the exciting Albarino, as well as Tempranillo’s other famous wine, Ribera del Duero. Emilio Moro is one the true superstars here. However, arguably the most exciting region lies above Barcelona in an area called Priorat. Alvaro Palacios has almost singularly handed created an icon wine from an unheralded area. Much like Áime Guibert did with Mas de Daumas Gassac all those years ago, Mr. Palacios has created a wine that is heralded all over the world, yet comes from a region not historically regarded for fine wine.

His icon wine is called L’Ermita and sells for serious money – I am too embarrassed to even write down the price. I stock his second wine, Les Terrasses and it recently won the award for the best Spanish red wine in Ireland. This is a serious wine. I had the great ‘pleasure’ of dropping a case of it a few months back. There were only 2 bottles broken, but considering that it is a wine that is actually hard to get an allocation of, this was a big deal. I was not impressed with my butter fingers.

As with all great wine regions, there are wines for everyone, and at all prices. As well as all of these icon wines, you can really get great wines for great prices in Spain. There is value to be had under 10 Euros and there is even better value at that 11-15 euro mark. There are really top wines with lots of forward fruit and easy drinking elegance. I have been talking with Alvaro about doing a proper Spanish wine tasting and once we have the much heralded Gassac tasting out of the way, we will put plans in place. Watch this space. By the way, the title for the article came from my first family holiday abroad. My father brought us on a JWT package holiday to Torremolinos on the Costa de Sol. It was one of those self catering apartment complexes by the beach. You had the battle the Germans for the best poolside sun bed each morning – I know it’s a cliché but it was true. Every night there would be some cabaret and we could hear the music as the bar terrace was directly under our room. This was great fun the first night, but we soon realised that the music went on until about 2.30am every night. The last song was always “Viva L’Espagna” and how we cheered when it finally came on, bleary eyed and exhausted. I have no doubt Spanish holidays have evolved and there is no doubt Spanish wine has. I still hate the song though.

Don’t forget to log onto the blog at www.rednosewine.com/blog or follow the ranting on Twitter – www.twitter.com/rednosewine

For anyone who would like more information and can’t make it into the shop, please feel free to contact me at info@rednosewine.com

“Life is much too short to drink bad wine”

Red Nose Wine Article - Nationalist Apr 15 2010

Mas de Daumas Gassac Tasting

April 16th, 2010

Slideshow of images

A Really great night was had in Clonmel with Samuel Guibert of Mas de Daumas Gassac. Samuel arrived on Tuesday and planned to leave on Thursday. The volcano in Iceland had something to say about that. In between all of this, we really had a special night’s tasting on Wednesday April 14th in the wonderful venue that is Nuala’s Cafe. Between the old style European venue, the sunshine, Samuel’s accent and the aperitif on arrival, we could really have been in a cafe in France.

Before the night’s tasting, I brought Samuel to see the Rock of Cashel. His brother Roman and I both were sentenced to a spell in nearby Rockwell College, and that is how we got talking when I met him in Paris originally.

Samuel at the Rock of Cashel

Samuel at the Rock of Cashel

Samuel spent some time in the warehouse – he was able to see for himself the growing selection at Red Nose Wine. I tried to get him to lift a few cases, but his phone got busy. :)

Samuel at Red Nose Wine

Samuel at Red Nose Wine

Gary Gubbins and Samuel Guibert

Gary Gubbins and Samuel Guibert

We started the tasting off with the Moulin de Gassac range which offers huge value starting from €9. The new Red Le Classic du Gassac also offered the Irish market a new red wine that will really offer huge value for money. Samuel did not get too technical with his presentation and spoke more about the history of Gassac and how his parents, Áime and Veronique started the vineyard after discovering Burgundy like soil in the middle of the Languedoc. Their drive and vision created a truly iconic wine. It has been hailed by many different commentators :

• The French magazine Gault-Milau called Daumas Gassac “Lafite Rothchild of the Languedoc-Roussillon”
• The London Times argued that it tasted like a “Latour”;
• Hugh Johnson called it “the only Grand Cru of the Midi”,
• Michael Broadbent wrote “One of the ten best wines in the world”
• Robert Parker claimed it to be “Exceptional” and “One of the most remarkable non-appellation wines of France.”
• The Wine Spectator’s 1994 article on this region concluded, “Only four wines rated outstanding, and they are all
from the same producer – Mas de Daumas Gassac, the undisputed star of the Languedoc-Roussillon.”

Samuel explaining about where the wines come from

Samuel explaining about where the wines come from

Samuel obviously has his father’s famous charisma as he wowed the crowed and explained everything from the possibility of secondary fermentation in a sweeter white wine ( the fizzy white syndrome ) to the varying experiments with different grape varieties over the years. He tackled questions on sulphites and even got into Hungarian Oak at one stage. Through it all, the crowd sat mesmerized, and I think his invite to everyone to visit him at the Domaine might be taken up. The female side of the room in particular were checking their diaries. I have had 3 calls to date asking when he is coming back, and a number of people who did not attend and were complaining that i did not tell them about Samuel. My pride was hurt, as they knew I would be there, but the wines were the real stars of the night.

Samuel talks about the great Mas de Daumas Gassac

Samuel talks about the great Mas de Daumas Gassac

The wines tasted on the night were :

Rose Frizant – served as an aperitif

Guilhem White

Faune ( Viognier based wine )

Classic Red – the new wine that was launched on the night. Great wine for the price.

Albaran

Mas de Daumas Gassac White 08

Mas de Daumas Gassac White 09

Mas de Daumas Gassac Red 07

Mas de Daumas Gassac Red 08

The stars i think were the Viognier dominated Faune and the 2007 Mas de Daumas Gassaec Rouge. The Albaran stood up as it always does, but can’t be compared to the Grand Cru.

The creamy undertones in the Mas de Daumas Gassac White 2008 contrasted with the sparkling freshness of the 2009. The Sauvignon lovers preferred 09 and the Riesling/Viognier lovers, 08.
All in all, it was a great night and I can’t wait for my trip in July to visit Samuel and his family in the wonderful Gassac Valley. I had a great time their last year.

A big thank you to Samuel for coming over to Clonmel. Also, a huge thank you to Nuala and Helen for all their work. Lastly, I would like to thank all the people who made the effort to come out. It was a great night.

Gary Gubbins of Red Nose Wine visiting Mas de Daumas Gassac

Gary Gubbins of Red Nose Wine visiting Mas de Daumas Gassac

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Video clips on the night

Article – Would you buy Wine in a Barrel

April 15th, 2010

Foodista Featured Wine Blog of the Day Badge

We have just finished one of the biggest couple of weeks in the wine world. By we, of course I mean the plethora of critics, buyers and press who descended on Bordeaux for the annual en Primeur tastings. I was invited I hasten to add, as long as I paid for everything myself. Considering the amount of high end Bordeaux I move in a week, I may wait until next year, or the year after. I import direct from Bordeaux, from some smaller vineyards direct, but also from the Negociants ( the ancient family houses who have the privilege to sell the big name wines to the world ). I deal with a number of them, as it is the only way I can gain access to the Lynch Bages type wines. To be fair they are great to deal with it and if I went, they would no doubt speak to me for a few minutes before brushing me aside as soon as the Chinese entered the fray. Before the politically correct rise up in protest, I must tell you that the Chinese are the big buyers of fine wine these days. The English and the Americans have well been left in the ha’penny place. You can imagine where the Irish are in the pecking order.

I should probably explain what en Primeur is. In a nutshell, about 6 months after the harvest, the great and the good congregate in Bordeaux to taste the wines that are happy at sleep in the barrels under some of the most famous chateaux in France. These wines usually need about 2 years before bottling so it could be considered a little strange to taste them at this early stage. Why would the Bordelaise consider such an apparent breaking of the sacred code? Like many of life’s strange decisions, such as excess borrowing against unsustainable capital appreciation, the answer is money. They came upon a great source of revenue to fill the gap when they waited for the wines to mature. They basically sell a portion of the wine at while it is still maturing, but at a ‘better’ price. Here lies the gamble. You are really assuming the wine will appreciate in value between the time you buy it and it is released to market. If it doesn’t, you are basically a free bank for the vineyards. Its appreciation will probably depend on whether the critics called the vintage correctly, i.e. is it as great as they think when it is released to market. To be honest, there is really only one that matters, the über critic himself, American Robert Parker. What he says goes, and if he gives a wine 95 points or more, grab it at the best price you can and treat it as you would early Microsoft stock. That wine’s price is going to rise over time. But, if the whole thing does go belly up, at least you can drink the investment. I imagine a bank share would taste fairly bitter, were you to try and consume it.

My thesis studied all of this and compared these investment wines to stocks, property and the like. I then went on to write a paper on fine wine as an investment class. Feel free to call into the shop to have a look at the 200 page thesis, and I will bore you to within an inch of your life. The one line synopsis is this – yes, fine wine is a great investment, but you need to pick the right wines in the right years. Most will lose you money. The Chinese are now buying up Lafite as it is seen as a luxury brand, along the lines of Prada and as there is only so much made, so prices are rising and fast. I am more interested in buying wines early that you can drink, and it is here that en Primeur is really worth looking at. Some of the smaller vineyards offer great value, as long as you are happy to drink the investment in 10 or 20 years. Another drawback to fine Bordeaux. It really does need time.

They are hailing 2009 as a serious vintage, albeit with very high alcohol content, which is not good in the short term. Memories flood back to 2005. This was hailed as the best vintage since 1961, and as we were in the middle of the boom ( March 2006 ), prices went bananas, and the best wines, and even some of the worst, were pushed out of everyone’s grasp. There is talk of this happening again and a return to those prices for 2009. However, considering the state of the world economy, that will really depend on the Chinese appetite for the wines. Unfortunately, it could force the price up of smaller, drinkable wines and I think that would be a disaster for Bordeaux. They need to learn from the mistakes of 2005 and get real. The only upside to 2005 is that there was still great value to be had in the serious wines of 2004. Demand fell, and prices followed suit, so if you do like the bigger names in Bordeaux, wines, look out for 2004 as it is a really good drinking vintage and prices are proper.

Don’t forget to log onto the blog at www.rednosewine.com/blog or follow the ranting on Twitter – www.twitter.com/rednosewine

For anyone who would like more information and can’t make it into the shop, please feel free to contact me at info@rednosewine.com

“Life is much too short to drink bad wine”

Red Nose Wine Article - Nationalist Apr 9 2010

A blog about Golf and Hangovers

April 10th, 2010

Je suis very hungover. I played golf yesterday in Mount Juliet with the Careys Golf society. Needless to say, my name was not up in lights by close of play. The shot of the day?
I birdied the Par 5 10th – a wedge shot played over the huge trees guarding the green to 1ft. That was the highlight.

The 10th hole in Mount Juliet

The 10th hole in Mount Juliet

The day turned into the night and hence the hangover. With this in mind, I am going to post a very lazy blog with lots of photos and a comedy clip that is one of the funniest you will ever hear about golf. Why is there no wine mentioned … There is more to life than wine…. there is also golf!

The crew who took part in Careys Masters

The crew who took part in Careys Masters

My perfect drive on the index 1...pity about the next few shots

My perfect drive on the index 1...pity about the next few shots

And this is what the hangover was like – kind of… I felt bad this morning. No more Guinness.

Article – Easter : Lamb, Chocolate & Wine

April 3rd, 2010

Hello Lovers of the Vine. We are in the holiest of weeks, and whatever your decision regarding rugby, alcohol or Good Friday, Easter offers a great excuse to trade up and enjoy the finer wines with your dinner. I myself will be closing the shop on Good Friday, as the law requires it, but I have always taken it handy on that day. I like to take a step back now and again, and that’s a great day to take stock. Of course it also means that I can spend a few more Euros at the weekend without any guilt. Being Catholic can often lend itself towards delayed gratification and the sweet taste that can so very often follow the sacrifice. With this in mind, and the recession clearly ignored, I am going to discuss wines to match two of Easter’s more popular delicacies – lamb and chocolate.

Let’s carve up the lamb first and this has some classic pairings that are already engrained in the wine vocabulary. There are a number of reasons for this. Going back thousands of years, to ancient Greece and into old France, Spain and Italy, the most popular meat was lamb. The sheep often grazed in the vineyards so the pairing was almost instinctive. Go to Greece (or even your local kebab shop) today and there is quite a lot of lamb on the menu. But add to this practicality, and the fact that the flavour of the lamb lends itself perfectly to wine. My mouth is watering as I write this, and I am not sure it is for the wine or for the lamb. It could also be that I was in Cork all day and was delayed getting back to the shop and had no lunch. A packet of peanuts might also make my mouth water at the moment. I digress again, and it is back to the lamb and in particular the wine to accompany it. I think it would depend on the cut of lamb and how it is prepared. If money is no object, then I would suggest a Pauillac from the Medoc region of Bordeaux. If your budget can’t stretch to a 1st growth Château Mouton Rothschild or even a 5th growth Lynch Bages, then there are plenty of substitutes. There are lots of really good value Bordeaux wines out there and it is the dry tannic nature of the Cabernet Sauvignon that reacts so well with the lamb. Many attest to the minty herbal nature of Cabernet with the grassiness of the lamb, and others think this is a load of rubbish. Pinot Noir tends to show off different sides of the lamb, so if it is not overly lean, I think the Pinot Noir can offer some great flavours. Regardless of the grape, one thing that seems to run true is that a chewier meat should be matched to a chewier wine, and by this I mean a younger tannic wine. The meat will make the wines seem smoother than they would be on their own. Other wines that go with Lamb for much the same reasons are Spanish Rioja’s and Italian Chianti or Sangiovese varieties. The really great news is that I have a huge selection of all of the above at all prices. We will be opening some of them this week. What is sure is that if you are looking to show your red wines at their best, be they Cabernet, Shiraz or Pinot Noir, match them with some lamb and you have a head start.

If you are not too pushed on your lamb, and would prefer to think about all that chocolate you gave up for Lent, then read on. If you gave up both chocolate and wine for Lent, then I am about to blow your mind. I am going to match chocolate and wine. I will give you a few minutes to gather yourself, and then we will begin. Are you ready? Many would argue that the two are incompatible. In fact one of the first things I was warned against eating before wine tasting was chocolate, along with garlic and mints. The idea was that the intense flavour of chocolate overwhelmed the wine. In this instance I am talking about real artisan concentrated chocolate, in much the same way as I always refer to handmade wine. At least with chocolate there is a brand association with quality. Because it is a controlled environment, and the weather doesn’t play a big role, you can mass produce great chocolate, unlike wine. The bad news for all you white wine drinkers is that chocolate prefers red wine. Unless it is something like a desert wine or IceWine, you will be looking at strong wines, with a lot of body, ideally, a bit of Cabernet for that minty undercurrent. This is much the same reason it goes with lamb, and as an interesting aside, why mint sauce is often served with lamb. You are looking for harmony and complimentary behaviour. It is the aftertaste in the chocolate that you are trying to stand up to, and you need this edge in the wine.

A perfect example is Chateau Paradis (Cabernet and Syrah), from Provence which was featured in the Irish Times last Saturday. There was a nice little piece on Red Nose Wine and Chateau Paradis, which was wine of the week. A fantastic wine for Easter and a real bargain at 15.50 a bottle. It will go with both the lamb and the chocolate. Was that a subtle plug or was it overly aggressive? The wine is ridiculously cheap for the quality, so I am confident to take the Pepsi challenge against other wines at that price.

I had a great time in Fethard last week. Thanks to all the committee members of the Acorn Childcare Committee for letting me talk about wine to a room full of 150 women. I learned all about the different shapes a woman can have at the fashion show. I think women are possibly as complex as wine. Tickets for the Wine tasting with Samuel Guibert on April 14th are really moving, so don’t be disappointed and book now – only 10 Euros for a chance to meet and taste with one of the great winemakers in France today.

Don’t forget to log onto the blog at www.rednosewine.com/blog or follow the ranting on Twitter – www.twitter.com/rednosewine

For anyone who would like more information and can’t make it into the shop, please feel free to contact me at info@rednosewine.com

“Life is much too short to drink bad wine”

Red Nose Wine Article - Nationalist Apr 1 2010

Mas de Daumas Gassac Tasting

April 1st, 2010

We are very excited to announce that Samuel Guibert of Mas de Daumas Gassac will be travelling to Ireland and Clonmel in particular for a very special tasting of Mas de Daumas Gassac wines. As well as the 2007 Red, we will be trying the new 2008 vintage, just released. We will also compare the 2008 White to the 2009. These are very special wines from a very special vineyard. The accolades for the wines stretch back over decades and too many to mention. A sample include :

“Daumas Gassac brought new ideas to the Languedoc by farming organically, using low-yielding old clone vines and planting a multitude of grape varieties to build complexity in their wines. The French magazine Gault-Milau called Daumas Gassac “Lafite Rothchild of the Languedoc-Roussillon” while the London Times argued that it tasted like a “Latour”; Hugh Johnson called it “the only Grand Cru of the Midi”, Michael Broadbent wrote “One of the ten best wines in the world” and Robert Parker, Jr. claimed it to be “Exceptional” and “One of the most remarkable non-appellation wines of France.” The Wine Spectator’s 1994 article on this region concluded, “Only four wines rated outstanding, and they are all from the same producer – Mas de Daumas Gassac, the undisputed star of the Languedoc-Roussillon.”

And for what it is worth, I agree. I had the great pleasure of visiting Gassac last year and saw for myself the magic in the valley.

Gary Gubbins of Red Nose Wine visiting Mas de Daumas Gassac

Gary Gubbins of Red Nose Wine visiting Mas de Daumas Gassac

Samuel Guibert welcoming Red Nose Wine to Mas de Daumas Gassac

Samuel Guibert welcoming Red Nose Wine to Mas de Daumas Gassac

We will also be tasting a range of wines from the Reserve Red & White, Concept wines – Elise, Albaran and Faune, as well as the Guilhem Red & White wines. We will also have an exclusive first tasting of the new wine – Le Classic du Gassac. €10 per Ticket, payable in advance.
Contact Gary Gubbins by phone 052-6182939, email or call into the shop or to Nuala’s cafe for tickets.

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