Browse Our Wines

Archive for 'Food'

Nicolas is back – Viranel Winemaker Dinner

October 24th, 2017

For those of you who were lucky enough to be at our winemaker dinner with Nicolas Bergasse from Chateau Viranel last November, you will be delighted to learn that he is back ( by popular demand ). For those of you who weren’t there, it was a great night and Nicolas’ charm and wines matched perfectly with the food and ambiance of Mulcahys in Clonmel.

Friday November 24th is the date. Book now to avoid disappointment.

Nicolas from Viranel at Wine Dinner

A great night was had and Nicolas went away with the promise of loads of help at this years harvest. I’m not sure how many made the trip but maybe he will get more empty promises this year. Its more about the conversation and the wine than the actual work :)

VIRANEL 2013 JM PEYRAL (465)

If you want to join the fun, the cost is €60 which includes 4 courses and 4 wines to match. The charming Frenchman is included. Booking is direct with Mulcahys so call 052-6125054 or call into their lovely pub/restaurant/guesthouse on Gladstone Street and book your tickets now. Ask for Sharon or Gerry.

Mulcahys Wine Dinner Poster

Press Release – Charity Wine Tasting November 24

October 26th, 2016

Red Nose Wine attracts exciting winemakers for charity wine tasting

Red Nose Wine has announced an exciting charity wine tasting will take place on Thursday, 24th of November at Raheen House Hotel in Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. Winemakers from Bodegas Sommos, Northern Spain, Chateau Viranel in Southern France and Champagne Duval-Leroy will all be present at the event showcasing some of their vineyards finest and sharing their stories. A representative from Liberty Wines, Red Nose Wine’s esteemed Italian Fine Wine import partner will also be showcasing the best of fine wines from Italy.

The team from Red Nose Wine will also be offering a large and diverse selection of wines and champagnes from their Christmas Collection for those in attendance. The event promises to be a great social event with an educational twist for those who want to learn a little or a lot while tasting on the night whilst raising much-needed funds for South Tipperary Hospice Movement.

Looking more closely at the winemakers in attendance, Bodegas Sommos is a unique vineyard in the Somontano D.O. located in Northern Spain. The winery has 350 hectares of vines spread over 5 vineyards. They like to experiment and use a wide variety of grapes including Tempranillo, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, Grenache, and Pinot Noir to make their various red wines. Chardonnay and Gewurztraminer are used in their white selection.

Chateau Viranel will also be showcasing and although they have been making wine at Viranel in Saint Chinian since 1551, the vineyard has recently enjoyed a new lease of life as the next generation has taken over operations. Nicolas studied agronomy in Toulouse, travelled overseas to gain work experience in places as diverse as Peru, New Zealand, South Africa, Chile, and California. In 2003, Nicolas started overseeing the grape harvest at Viranel and Arnaud joined him in 2009, to handle sales and marketing.

Another family business, Champagne Duval-Leroy, has dedicated itself to the noble craft of champagne-making since 1859. Champagne pioneers, Duval-Leroy has always been driven by a quest for high standards and innovation in every aspect of the business, from quality, consistency and certification through to partnerships with sommeliers and chefs. It is a member of the very prestigious Relais & Chateaux partnership. Champagne Duval-Leroy have recently become the champagne of choice for the prestigious Cliff Group (who are also members of Relais & Chateaux), and their luxury hotels and restaurants in Ardmore, Co. Waterford, St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin and the new Cliff at Lyons in County Kildare.

Gary Gubbins, Proprietor of Red Nose Wine commented “we have hand-picked these winemakers to attend as I feel they each bring a very different offering to the table. Champagne Duval-Leroy is a traditional champagne house and I think patrons should take advantage of the rare opportunity to taste Grand Cru champagne. Bodegas Sommos’ different approach to winemaking is fascinating and I expect people will be impressed by this experimental and innovative approach to the winemaking process. We have been working with Arnaud and Viranel for a number of years and I always look forward to meeting up with him. He is always full of infectious energy and has the gift of the gab that I think people will enjoy and it helps that he has super wines to boot.”

Tickets are €15 with all wines on the evening sponsored by Red Nose Wine to ensure maximum funds are generated for the charity. For further information and bookings visit www.rednosewine.com.

For further information contact:
Carey-Ann Lordan, Red PR
T: 052 6184343 M: 087 9270730 E: clordan@redpr.ie W: www.redpr.ie
Gary Gubbins, Red Nose Wine
T: 052 6182939 M: 086 3326486 E: gary@rednosewine.com W: www.rednosewine.com

Gary Gubbins proprietor of Red Nose Wine and organiser of the fundraising event

Gary Gubbins proprietor of Red Nose Wine and organiser of the fundraising event

Viranel owners Arnaud (left) and Nicholas (right) to showcase a selection of exciting wines, share their story and answer your questions at the tasting

Viranel owners Arnaud (left) and Nicholas (right) to showcase a selection of exciting wines, share their story and answer your questions at the tasting

South Tipperary Hospice Movement – Photo of their offices located on The Quay, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary

South Tipperary Hospice Movement – Photo of their offices located on The Quay, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary

About Red Nose Wine

Red Nose Wine specialises in importing wine of the highest quality from smaller and family run vineyards. There is a lot of very good wine at a very good price in the world, but it is often hidden within its locality, be it in a small country village in Piedmont, or just a few steps away from a very famous Bordeaux chateau. The same can be said of Spanish, New Zealand and Chilean wines, to name but a few. The wines with the biggest advertising budgets are rarely the best wines at the best price. Our winemaker’s skills lie more in wine making than marketing, which makes them that little bit harder to find. We believe wine should reflect the people who make it as much as the place where it comes from.

About South Tipperary Hospice Movement

South Tipperary Hospice Movement is a community specialist palliative care service, providing support for people in South Tipperary/West Waterford with an advanced incurable disease. They support patients and their families in their own home as far as possible. They aim to deliver the highest level of individualised care showing respect, compassion and dignity to all persons in their care. The aim of the specialist palliative homecare nursing service is to focus on the quality of life which includes good symptom control, a holistic approach that takes into account the person’s life experience and current situation, care that encompasses both the dying person and those who matter to that person, and an emphasis on open and sensitive communication, which extends to patients, carers and professionals. They endeavour to provide a seamless system of care for patients and relatives from the time of diagnosis of cancer / motor neurone disease to death or discharge from the service.

The Winemakers

Winemakers from Bodegas Sommos, Northern Spain, Chateau Viranel in Southern France and Champagne Duval-Leroy will all be present at the event showcasing some of their vineyards finest and sharing their stories. We will also have our old friend Gerry from Liberty Wines, our esteemed Italian Fine Wine import partner, to showcase the best of fine wines from Italy.

Bodegas Sommos

Bodegas Sommos is a unique vineyard in the Somontano D.O. located in Northern Spain. The winery has 350 hectares of vines spread over 5 vineyards. They like to experiment and use a wide variety of grapes including Tempranillo, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, Grenache, and Pinot Noir to make their various red wines. Chardonnay and Gewurztraminer are used in their white selection.
Since Red Nose Wine have introduced the range to Ireland, they have become a firm favourite with the press and the public.
Website: http://www.bodegasommos.com/

Chateau Viranel

Although they have been making wine at Viranel in Saint Chinian since 1551, the vineyard has recently enjoyed a new lease of life as the next generation has taken over operations.
Arnaud (photographed on the left) was big into sports and it looked as though he was going to become a sports teacher. Nicolas studied agronomy in Toulouse, travelled overseas to gain work experience in places as diverse as Peru, New Zealand, South Africa, Chile and California.
In 2003, Nicolas started overseeing the grape harvest at Viranel and two years later, he moved in and made it his home. Arnaud joined him in 2009, handling the sales and marketing side of the equation, and the rest is history.
“Today, working together, we’re writing a new chapter in the story of Viranel. We like to think that by combining our skills, energy and enthusiasm with the heritage that’s been handed down to us, we can bring something new to the table.” said the dynamic duo.
Website: http://www.viranel.com/en/home.html

Champagne Duval-Leroy

Another family business, this house has dedicated itself to the noble craft of champagne-making since 1859. Champagne pioneers, Duval-Leroy have always been driven by a quest for high standards and innovation in every aspect of the business, from quality, consistency and certification through to partnerships with sommeliers and chefs. It is a member of the very prestigious Relais & Chateaux partnership. Champagne Duval-Leroy have recently become the champagne of choice for the prestigious Cliff Group (who are also members of Relais & Chateaux), and their luxury hotels and restaurants in Ardmore, Co. Waterford, St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin and the new Cliff at Lyons in County Kildare.
Website: http://www.duval-leroy.com/en/home/

Charity Wine Tasting Event for South Tipperary Hospice Movement (STHM)

Date: Thursday, 24th of November 2016
Time: 7.30pm – 9.30pm
Location: Raheen House, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary
Members of the public are invited to purchase tickets for the wine tasting in support of South Tipperary Hospice Movement. The timing is ideal as this event is the start of the pre-Christmas party season and a great time to get your Christmas wines selected in good time for the big day. There will be competitions and much more on the evening also. Tickets must be purchased in advance and early booking is advised.

Tickets

Tickets are superb value at €15 with all wines being sponsored by Red Nose Wine to ensure maximum funds are generated for South Tipperary Hospice Movement on the night. To book online please visit www.rednosewine.com and tickets are also available from the South Tipperary Hospice Movement Office on The Quay, Red Nose Wine, The Regal Centre and Marian’s Bookshop, O’Connell Street, Clonmel. Tickets are also widely available throughout county Tipperary from STHM Support Group and usual STHM ticketing outlets.

Wine Dinner with Mary Gaynor

November 11th, 2015

Tickets are selling fast for our Wine Dinner with Mary Gaynor from the Wine Academy.
It is happening in Befanis restaurant on Friday November 27th. Mary is going to talk us through some great wines in a jovial & informal manner, and we will match the wines to Fulvio & Adrian’s fine food. This will be a fun night ( it is on a Friday after all ), so bring some friends – first come first served.
Mary Gaynor

The price is only €50 which includes 5 fantastic wines as well as some incrediblefood – all matched by a Master. Last year was a really super night. We are taking bookings now - you’re place is only secured when you pay the €50. Contact Brendan on 052-6182939 or at brendan@rednosewine.com to book

This is selling fast so don’t delay.

The Long Table Dinner is back

July 28th, 2015

The Tipperary Food Producers are coming to CoolBawn

The Tipperary Food Producers are coming to CoolBawn

The Tipperary Food Producers Network is once again hosting a Long Table Dinner, set this year in the idyllic surrounds of Coolbawn Quay on the shores of Lough Derg, Co Tipperary. The banquet promises to broaden the imagination as well as the palate of food lovers from all over Ireland on Wednesday August 19th.

A charming boutique resort, bordered by forests and lush rolling green fields, Coolbawn Quay is built in the style of a traditional Irish village and has a sense of timeless tranquillity but with all the comforts of contemporary life.

Entertainment on the evening will be provided by singer Sharon Crosbie in her own inimitable style of haunting jazz.

Rockwell College Long Table Dinner

A scene from a previous Long Table Dinner

Tipperary Food Producers Network Chairman Mr. Pat Whelan commented that “The Long Table Dinner is a great opportunity for us all to showcase the very best of our produce to a local and national audience. It will be a feast for all the senses – not just the taste buds.”

Over the last year Tipperary Food Producers Network members really have reached the stars having won sixteen Great Taste Awards. Often described as the food Oscars, this world-famous competition, organised by the Guild of Fine Food, is the acknowledged benchmark for specialty food and drink products. Building on this success, the Long Table Dinner will showcase the vast range of quality artisan food produced within the county. The evening will be a virtual culinary tour of Tipperary with a special menu of products sourced exclusively from the 29 members of the Tipperary Food Producers Network. More information on the members can be found at www.tipperaryfoodproducers.com.

This year the Long Table Dinner is part of ‘A Taste of Lough Derg’ series of food events that are taking place around the Lakelands Lough Derg Region from June until September and more details of these events are available online at www.atasteofloughderg.ie.

Tickets for this Long-table-dinner-2015_3year’s event  cost €75 and are available at James Whelan Butchers, Oakville Shopping Centre, Clonmel on (052) 6182477 OR directly from Coolbawn Quay on (067) 28158.

Ticket holders are asked to be at Coolbawn Quay by 7.00pm sharp as the meal will commence at  7.30 p.m. Tickets are required for entry to the long table dinner event.

This is an event not to be missed….tickets are limited and selling fast.

Food Glorious Food – a New Section

March 6th, 2015

A new beginning

A little orphan called Oliver once sang about Food, Glorious Food. We also think it glorious and especially when it is matched with a lovely bottle of wine. But that’s for another day. For now, I’d like to introduce you to stage 1 of a major redesign for Red Nose Wine. Now open in the shop is our new food & coffee & Oils section ( we’re open to suggestions on a name – Red Nose Nosh? )

New Food Section at Red Nose Wine

New Food Section at Red Nose Wine

Coffee – Organic & Decaf

We hope to expand the food offering over time but for now, we are concentrating on organic Coffees. We have ground coffee from Nicaragua, Peru, Columbia as well as a range of Italian roasted beans in different styles. We also have a delicious ( and I never thought I would say this ) Decaf coffee. The trick is to keep it in beans apparently. Call in and try some. Prices start at €4.95 for a 250g bag.

Coffee Coffee Coffee

Coffee Coffee Coffee

Oils – Olive & Truffle

We have dabbled in oils a little bit up to now, but we have ramped it up considerably. We have oils from France and a range of Extra Virgin Olive Oil from Italy, incuding a great value 5L tin. Only €37.50 for the equivilant of 10 x 500ml bottles at €3.75 each. Did you know oil keeps much better in a tin ( no light gets in ). If you really want to treat yourself, try the truffle oil. A taste sensation.

Vinegar & Oil

Vinegar & Oil

Pasta – Gluten Free and Regular

We are working with Ireland’s premium importer of authentic Italian foods and are delighted to stock a range of pastas, including Tagliatelle, Spaghetti, Penne, Fusilli, and as well as regular pasta we have a range that are Gluten Free. Prices start at €1.95

Water Water Everywhere

When I am abroad I always like a glass of sparkling water to help with digestion but I find most Irish waters too fizzy. We are now stocking San Pelligrino in 750ml glass bottles. Try it before you buy it. Only €1.75.

Vinegar – Sauces – Risotto & Breadsticks

Our very popular Gassac Balsamic Vinegar is back in stock and we have also added an Italian version at a less luxurious price. We have a Tomato/Basil sauce, Risotto Rice and even some very nice breadsticks. We have changed the shop around so please call down to see what we have done.

Una celebrazione di tutte le cose Italiano ( my best guess )

Some of the range

Some of the range

Wine Dinner – Anges in Tipp

November 13th, 2012

We are delighted to welcome over Florent Chave, chief winemaker at Domaine des Anges to Tipperary for a night of wine, fun and food in the famous McCarthys of Fethard. You can buy tickets here.

Florent Chave of Domaine des Anges

Florent Chave of Domaine des Anges

This Irish owned vineyard has long been a favorite of our customers and what better way to start the Christmas run in than with a tapas style wine night.

interior_night_mccarthys

McCarthys of Fethard has long since been a famous pub, so much so that they have been afraid to change the interior since 1847. As well as a great pub, it also hosts a great restaurant and a great wine list. They take the vine very seriously here, so book your tickets now for this event sold out very quickly last year and we expect this one to follow suit so get your tickets now.

domaine-anges-logo1

Tickets are only €40 and can be booked online or via Red Nose Wine at 052-6182939 or email info@rednosewine.com – Book now. A night not to be missed.

When Darina met Veronique

July 19th, 2012

We are delighted and proud to be associated with a very special event on August 2nd in Ballymaloe Cookery School. Madame Véronique Guibert de La Vaissière of the iconic Mas de Daumas Gassac vineyard in the Languedoc will present her new cookery book, ‘Savours and Flavours of Mas Daumas Gassac’. To celebrate its launch Darina Allen is having a Long Table Dinner under the unique setting of the Ballymaloe Glasshouse.

A Long table to be filled with food, wine and people

A Long table to be filled with food, wine and people

The food will no doubt be wonderful as it always is in Ballymaloe, but from a wine perspective, the only wines being served at this event are the Mas de Daumas Gassac Grand Cru wines, and they are included in the price.

One of the many rows in the Glasshouse

One of the many rows in the Glasshouse

Two iconic families – one shared vision

Samuel Guibert, Darina Allen and Gary Gubbins

Samuel Guibert, Darina Allen and Gary Gubbins

Aimé & Véronique Guibert, and their family, of iconic French wine estate, Mas de Daumas Gassac, are responsible for what has been described as ‘ The only Grand Cru of the Midi’ , writes Hugh Johnson, and the legendary wine writer, Michael Broadbent described Gassac as ‘ one of the 10 best wines in the world’. Red Nose Wine are proud to represent Mas de Daumas Gassac in Ireland. We have had many a good night with them in the past, both in Ballymaloe and in Clonmel.

Gary Gubbins with Aime and Samuel Guibert

Gary Gubbins with Aime and Samuel Guibert

The Guiberts

The Guiberts

In the introduction to her cookbook, ‘Savours and Flavours of Mas Daumas Gassac, Mme Guibert – ‘… this extraordinary place which had been caringly cultivated for thousands of years and now our home…mealtime around the table are the most special moments, the most beautiful time , deeply imbedded in the memory of all. It is this happiness that I evoke and wish to share with you’

The keeper of the glasshouse

A few weeks ago I called down to see Colm McCan in Ballymaloe, the Tipperary sommelier and a great champion of Gassac wines. He gave me a tour of the Cookery School, the farm and the Glasshouse, which is a very impressive acre under glass. They even have a vine.

A vine in Co. Cork

A vine in Co. Cork

Eileen O Donavan holds court in the glasshouse and we got her to explain exactly what they grow and what might we expect to be eating at the Long Table Dinner..

What exactly is happening

4.00pm Welcome drink and canapés – Mas de Daumas Gassac Rosé Frizant.

4.30pm Darina Allen and Mme.Véronique Guibert de La Vaissière will welcome all with a presentation,

5.30pm/6.00pm Guests move to the glasshouse, through the farm and gardens, to the ‘Long Table Dinner’. Menu by Rory O’Connell, inspired by the cookbook, ‘Savours and Flavours of Mas de Daumas Gassac’ matched with the Grand Cru wines of Mas de Daumas Gassac.

There might even be some music

There might even be some music

Dinner €120 (including wines) – Advance booking essential
Proceeds will go to East Cork Slow Food Educational Project
Please Email the Ballymaloe Cookery School at info@cookingisfun.ie to reserve a place

The ‘Social’ Media Wine Blitz

June 5th, 2012

The bank holiday weekend say a media blitz from Red Nose Wine. We were featured in no less than 4 national media outlets. The Irish Times, RTE Radio 1, RTE News website and RTE1 Television.

The Irish Times piece was all about our Chateau Bauduc Rose and the link can be found here.

Bauduc Rose Irish Times June 2012

Radio 1 – Morning Ireland

We were on the early slot with Radio 1 and the theme was Social Media in Business. You can listen to it here. The “Twitter veteran” comes in at 3.17m.

RTE Website piece

The full piece is here but Red Nose Wine gets a nice mention

“One month after Ireland was officially declared in recession, Gary Gubbins opened his business, Red Nose Wine, in Clonmel Co Tipperary. Despite what was arguably poor timing, Gubbins’ business is still growing and he says its thanks in no small part to social media.

He attributes his wines appearing on wine lists in Ballymaloe House and the Michelin starred Cliff House Hotel to building connections on Twitter. Similarly, he says social networking helped him to find better ways of doing business.
“I’ve forged some really good relationships. I import a lot of wines together with others, including Curious wines in Cork, Cases in Galway, and Simply in Dublin and all of that came about through Twitter.”

Gubbins blogs, tweets and posts on Facebook in order to further his business connections. Many other businesses are doing the same, and hundreds more want to learn how”

Coming up on Nationwide ...

Coming up on Nationwide ...

RTE Nationwide

I wonder how many of the average 500,000 Nationwide viewers were watching? Hopefully some of them will give us a call online or in person. I will try to get a cut of the actual segment but for the moment the whole show is on RTE Player. The social media bit starts at 12m and Red Nose Wine come in at 17m. The link is here.

Article – Horses for Courses

May 24th, 2012

The communions are in full swing as I write this on a sunny / cloudy Saturday morning. I passed a good few white dresses and stressed parents on the way into work this morning. We have a five year old’s birthday to contend with but it seems less daunting than the communions.

Knobbly knees and Dairy Milks

My memory of my communion is my neighbour buying me a red confirmation rosette instead of a white communion one. Everyone noticed and laughed outside St Marys church. At least my mother didn’t dress me in shorts like some of the lads. The sight of the knobbly knees brigade deflected away from my Red rosette. There were no wine laden dinners in those days or €50 notes in a card. Careys Lounge was the post communion setting and Dairy Milk the reward for making the big step on your spiritual journey.

Anyway, memory lane is an indulgence the good wine public of Tipperary won’t suffer too much longer, so I better talk about wine. I want to compare wines to the breeding of horses, if I may. I recently joined the FUSE initiative, which is an networking organisation among businesses in the South East of Ireland. They organised a breakfast meeting in Coolmore this week and I jumped at the chance to attend.

I had never been there and have long been fascinated by what they do. I was lucky enough to attend the Ryder Cup in Ireland a few years ago and it was organised to such a word class level, it made me really proud to be Irish. Coolmore had a similar effect.

The Great Galileo

I am way off the point now, but in an attempt to be succinct, Coolmore is a world leader, and sets worldwide standards for others in their industry to try and reach. It is an example of what the Irish can do well, but it is coupled with an execution and vision that sets it apart. I came out of the visit very inspired, and I got to meet Galileo. I was hoping to meet Dylan Thomas as he made me some nice money a few years ago. I owe him at least a lump of sugar.

A fine Tipperary Stallion

A fine Tipperary Stallion

Hey Camelot – who’s your Daddy?

A good friend on mine in London, originally from Clonmel is an avid follower of Ballydoyle and the great Aidan O Brien. He has put a ‘small’ wager on a horse called Camelot in the Epson Derby. The horse is favourite so why is that strange? He placed the bet ante post at over 20-1. I have a very nice case of wine set aside for his hopeful winnings.

Who's your Daddy

Who's your Daddy

Communions, stallions and very little wine – what are we to do. Those familiar with Coolmore will know about a horse called Northern Dancer, and his son Saddlers Wells. My mate Galilieo is a son of Saddlers. The breeding in this line of horses has created a roll of champions that is the envy of the racing world. Wine is quite similar, but slightly different.

The 1855 classification in Bordeaux tells us what were the great wines of that year, and bye and large, they still hold true. They were broken into five groups with the 1er Cru at the top. One of these five is Chateau Margaux and it was regarded the very best estate in Margaux back then, and still is. Chateau Latour and Lafite are still seen as the standard bearers for Paulliac. Their ‘breeding line’ has stood the test of time.

Chateau Margaux – the Coolmore of Wine

Chateau Margaux - the Coolmore of Wine?

While I appreciate that vines don’t breed as a stallion and brood mare might, the fact exists that the same vines are consistently producing great wines year after year. Over 150 years after their greatness was recognised, they are still the standard bearers. While the root vine and terroir are a part of this, there is also constant reinvestment and the attention to detail is staggering.

There are many examples of vineyards within the list that didn’t maintain their attention to detail and have fallen back into mediocrity. While they maintain their place on the list, the prices paid for the wines reflect their true standing.

The manicured vines of Chateau Margaux

The manicured vines of Chateau Margaux

Equally, if I go out and look for a pieball pony and breed it with any old willing mare, there is a good chance its offspring will not challenge Camelot or any of his siblings at Epsom. I could go and buy a few hectares in the south of France and go and make wine. I can be as meticulous as I like, but if that land is not suitable for making great wine, I will join the many who live in the pleasant world of mediocrity.

That is not a bad place to be, as long as you know where you are. I must stress I am talking about the top end of wine here. This should not take from the fact that most of the wines we drink and gain pleasure from do not fit into this elite group. It should be stated that previously unheralded parts of the world have created superstar wines. The Languedoc is now producing some of the finest wines in the world. They are a fraction of the prices of the top Bordeaux and Burgundy. Seabiscuit does exist in the wine world.

If Seabiscuit was a vineyard

Places like the Terrases du Larzac always had the ‘breed’ in the land, but it was never properly harvested. Bulk wines are all about volume, while fine wine is all about concentration. These two cannot co-exist so when serious wine makers came in, they brought execution and vision. The latest scores for La Peira have just been released and they are touching 100 points. I have tasted most of the top Bordeaux wines, and La Peira is a serious contender.

Jeremie Depierre shows me the cellars in La Peira

Jeremie Depierre shows me the cellars in La Peira

Many more experimental winemakers will go and get clippings from the great estates of the world transplant them to their vineyard. Aime Guibert of Mas de Daumas Gassac did this back in the 1970s in his now famous estate. People thought he was mad, but he grafted Burgundy Pinot Noir, Bordeaux Cabernet, Piedmonte Nebbiolo and many more to create a unique vineyard that was eventually described as the Grand Cru of the Midi.

The great Languedoc pioneer Aime Guibert and his son Samuel

The great Languedoc pioneer Aime Guibert and his son Samuel

A very fine affair in Ballymaloe

While his Grand Cru red is 80% Cabernet Sauvignon, there are 19 or so other varieties that Samuel Guibert describes as the salt and pepper. Samuel’s mother Veronique co founded the vineyard with Aime and she has written a book based on cooking among the vines in the Gassac Valley. I am honoured to co host an event for the launch of this book on August 2nd in Ballymaloe.

Darina Allen and her team in the famous Cookery School are having a long table dinner in the grounds of the school with Madame Guibert’s book being the inspiration for the menu. The Grand Cru wines are going to be served as the Allens and the Guibert’s talk and taste their way through a feast of food and wine. Get your tickets quick as this is a small intimate event.

Who’s coming to Epsom?

So, I will be cheering on Camelot on June 2nd and hoping to move a case of La Peira to my ante post hero. I may have to consider going over to Epsom to make sure all runs smoothly. Now there is a plan worth pursuing. We could organise a bus from McCarthys in Fethard. I’ll bring the wine if someone else brings the tickets.

The new Loyalty card scheme is proving very popular. The Silver cards are free, and after 10 stickers ( earned every time you spend €25 ) you get FREE WINE. You also get a Gold card and at the end of that, there is even more FREE WINE, and you move on to the revered platinum card. The May sale if still on, so call in for 20% off the Languedoc and South Africa.

Don’t forget to log onto the blog at www.rednosewine.com/blog, visit our All New Facebook page at www.facebook.com/RedNoseWineFanPage or follow the ranting on Twitter – www.twitter.com/rednosewine

For anyone who would like more information and can’t make it into the shop, please feel free to contact me at info@rednosewine.com

“Life is much too short to drink bad wine”

Do Wives Listen – AKA How to store Wine

March 21st, 2012

I have something shocking to relay to all of the men out there who are in committed loving relationships with women. We are all familiar with the acquiescence nature of their nodding and smiling, as you give them some hard earned bit of knowledge that will in no doubt better their situation in life. They may not be taking us seriously at all. I don’t think they are listening.

Sharing is Caring

I am years telling my wife all about the amazing world of wine and I am generous to a fault when sharing with her all the stories and advice that I feel has enriched my life. Sometimes I would spend hours regaling her with tales from the vines. I thought she was enthralled; now I am beginning to believe that she was secretly listening to her iPod as I pontificated.

When Wine goes Bad

When Wine goes Bad

I came home recently to her proud declaration that the wine in the house was now on display. I wasn’t sure what this meant as I don’t have too much wine in the house at any one time. I tend to move it ‘into position’ on a sideboard ahead of future consumption, so the display part was confusing me.

Don’t put the wine in the Oven

We have a furniture piece on which sits the TV and there is a glass shelf which forms the base on which the TV sits, but there is lots more space on this surface. My wife decided to slide the wines in under the glass and beside the TV, Video, DVD, Sky Box and under a lamp. You would find it tough to pick a worse place to store wines, other than in the oven.

The Cliff House and their Wine cellar

The Cliff House and their Wine cellar

Wine hates fluctuations in temperature. Wives do not listen to husbands. Germany owns Ireland and China owns the USA. These are all facts and one must respect facts, but we don’t necessarily have to like them. We must adapt as these facts start to affect our lives. The wines were moved immediately and the dirtiest of looks given in the direction of the decorator.

That piece of narrative leads us to the point of the article, the correct storage of wines. That wasn’t subtle at all, was it? Wine storage can be broken down into three categories, light, humidity and temperature. All three need to be controlled if you really want to keep those prize bottles. If you plan on opening the bottle before you get it home, this storage problem may not affect you. The statistics on the time between purchase and consumption is startling.

Another fine cellar @ Ballymaloe House

Another fine cellar @ Ballymaloe House

Stay away from the Light Carole Anne

Let us talk of the light. The lighter the wine, the more at risk it is. Wine, if made properly, is an organic, living entity and is sensitive to change, as are we. Light and delicate wines are most at risk, which is why you will often see them in dark bottles. Strong, direct sunlight or incandescent light can adversely react with phenolic compounds in wine and create these potential wine faults. This is why ‘they’ recommend a dark cupboard, as opposed to a window display.

Humility and Humidity

I am a big fan of humility in wines, and in people. If you are as great as you think you are, we will discover it at the appropriate time. This theory applies to both wine and people and has nothing to do with humidity, which is all about moisture in the air. This is needed in order to keep wines with cork enclosures from drying out. If the cork starts to dry out, then it allows oxygen in and this is bad. Incidentally there are mixed views on the optimum level of humidity; but 75% seems like a good enough number.

Some Like it Hot

The big thing that wine does not like while being stored is big changes in temperature. Once again, the more delicate the wine, then the more sensitive it is to change. Your big Barossa Shiraz will fare much better than your German Riesling. Once again there are various figures bandied about regarding optimal storage temperatures. I like 12-13 degrees centigrade myself but you are OK at 15. The key is not to fluctuate too much. Cold is better than hot, but too cold is also bad as the corks expand and that dreaded oxygen gets in.

Wine is stored on its side to keep some contact with the cork and stop it from drying out. So that’s all you need to know on how to store your wine. All you need to do now is call down to Red Nose Wine and start that cellar. TV cabinets are not ideal storage venues, but to be fair to my wife, and her apparent dismissing of years of tutelage, when she asks my opinion on which shoes go with which dress, or when she is asking for my input into important domestic decisions, I don’t always give it 100% focus. I’m usually thinking about wine.

The Nationalist Wine Column is back

The Nationalist Wine Column is back

Don’t forget to log onto the blog at www.rednosewine.com/blog, visit our All New Facebook page at www.facebook.com/RedNoseWineFanPage or follow the ranting on Twitter – www.twitter.com/rednosewine

For anyone who would like more information and can’t make it into the shop, please feel free to contact me at info@rednosewine.com

“Life is much too short to drink bad wine”

Categories