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Fathers Day Wines and Bloomsday rambling

June 16th, 2017

Its a long time since i wrote a blog. ( btw – you can skip half way down to get to the offers if you don’t want to indulge in the ramble ) I usually do the MailChimp shots with a photo or an offer or whatever else comes to mind on a Thursday evening or sometimes Friday morning. My radio ‘career’ on Tipp FM has taken me from the articles i used to like writing for The Nationalist. The odd piece for the Sunday Business Post aside, my inner James Joyce ( it is Bloomsday ) has been stifled. In the words of Freddy Mercury, “I want to break free”

Red or White?

One of the most popular gifts for Fathers Day is wine. It is a quick and easy fix and a lot of Dads really like wine. I know its a terrible and often untrue cliche that Men like Red and Women like White wine. I am a Dad and like wine. However, i do like Red, White and Rose, but its my job to, so maybe I’m not the best example. However, one thing is true. When people are buying wine as a gift for a man, 99 times out of 100 they will buy Red wine.

Buy me some Burgundy

While it is very nice to own a wine business, one draw back is that everyone is afraid to buy me wine. If they bought some cheap supermarket rubbish they would have good reason to fear my wrath, but nobody should ever be afraid to buy me a good bottle of Burgundy ( another subtle Bloomsday reference for all of you Joycean scholars ).

bloomsday-greetings

I’m partial to a good vintage of La Tache, but who isn’t. Alas, it never happens and I fear Fathers Day may pass me by once more, but it should not mean that the Fathers in your life should go without. With that in mind, i have 4 Red Wines to tempt you with. And I picked these wines with me in mind. 2 from France, 1 from New Zealand and 1 from Italy.

The Wine Offers are here

France

Domaine des Anges has long been a favourite of mine. I harbour dreams of cycling up Mount Ventoux some day and falling into the lovely pool in the vineyard afterwards. The Red is normally €17.99 but down to €14.99 to treat the Daddy in your life. Buy it here

Ventoux_M

I met the lovely Vicky at a wine show a few years ago and she makes equally lovely Fleurie – a perfect summer wine. You could even chill it a little if it gets too hot this weekend ( but don’t tell Vicky ). Normally €22 but down to €17.99 – Buy it here

New Zealand

If any of you bothered to google la Tache you will see it is a silly price, but we do have a lovely New Zealand Pinot called the Better Half and it is also a great little summer wine. Not too heavy and full of sweet strawberry and macerated cherry flavour. Yum. Normally €19.99 but down to €16.99 which is a great price for New Zealand Pinot ( especially in the current currency environment ). Buy it here

Italy

Last but by no mean least, we have something special. A magnum ( which means a double size bottle ) of Barolo. This is a wine for putting away and opening in 5,10 or 20 years. Maybe when the kids go to college. We are down to our last 6 in the shop, and when they go, they are gone. Normally €65 but all Daddys should own some Barolo so we are giving this away for €50 – Buy it here

Me looking smug in the vineyards of Barolo

Me looking smug in the vineyards of Barolo

Happy Bloomsday and Happy Fathers Day this Sunday to all the heroes out there ( I know the mothers are the heroes but just give us this one day ( and buy us some wine ).

By the way, i deliberately didn’t put on wines that are €12.99 down to €9.99 because we fathers deserve a treat. Don’t be insulting us with cheap wines :)

Life is much too short to drink bad wine

Article – Italy, you really have a lot of wine

May 27th, 2010

Now and again the wine world and the political world collide, and politics being politics and collisions inevitable, this can mean one can find oneself treated to a wonderful all expenses paid event. One such collision took place in Cork last week, at the very comfortable Clarion Hotel. The Italian Trade Commission are trying to increase awareness of Italian Wine in Ireland, and with the help of Jean Smullen, a well known organiser of marquee wine trade events, they organised a tutored tasting. What is a tutored tasting as opposed to a regular tasting I hear you ask? A fine question, that someone somewhere surely has asked.

A Tasting vs A Tutored Tasting

A regular tasting involves tables full of wine, where everyone supposedly follows a very regimental anticlockwise routine, where we walk around a large hall talking to the importer or the winemakers, while supping and spitting. The true professionals make two trips, the first taking in the whites and the second the reds. I have not always been the true professional in this regard, and I would not suggest tasting a delicate Soave after a big Brunello di Montalcino. Anyway, this tasting was not of that type, for we sat at tables and had a neat array of tasting glasses in front of us. It was like being back at school. The glasses sat upon a mat and were numbered 1 to 6. There was a swarm of bottles to be seen but alas, our glasses were empty. Before the tasting, came the tutoring.

Let The Powerpoint Begin

There was a big screen set up and Helen Coburn, a well know authority on Italian wine, set about a very in-depth and fast as lightening PowerPoint assessment of the white wines of Italy. The range of grapes and regions and rules that are obeyed and rules that are ignored put instant validity to the need for a regional expert such as Helen. When many people think of Italian wines, they think Tuscany or Sicily or maybe the ever popular Pinot Grigio. That’s a fair enough assessment of what is popular in Italian wine, but like many things in life, there is always so much more. We flew through grapes such as Pinot Bianco, Cortese, Garganega, Trebbiano, Verdicchio, Vernaccia di San Gimignano, Greco di Tufo, Vermentino, Inzolia and Prosecco with speed and precision. For those planning a wine holiday, the regions included Trentino / Alto Adige, Piedmonte, Veneto, Lombardy, Marche, Umbria, Lazio, Tuscany, Campania, Sardinia and Sicily. So who thought there was only Pinot Grigio in Italy?

Italian Wine Map

Italian Wine Map

There are many other white wine varieties grown in Italy that were mentioned but the varieties above are what we eventually tasted. I have a mass of notes on each wine, and I was happy to see a number of Red Nose Wine selections amongst the mix. We have been working very hard this last year to improve our Italian selection. Our €8.50 Pinot Grigio’s big sales are testament to the fact that the public like what we are doing. Rather than bore you with individual tasting notes on all wines tasted (there are many others who specialise in this), I will list of some of the words scribbled down in the frenzied tasteathon. Creamy, High alcohol, medium acidity, nervy, grassy, yeasty, fresh, good price point, lemon tones, crisp, dry, not enough fruit to the fore, fills the mouth. These of course were for the whites. All wines were spat out.

The Matching of the Food & Wine

After the whites were tasted and rated, we were then invited to partake in a matching of food to wines with Lorenzo Loda, the Italian sommelier from Thorntons Restaurant in Dublin. Little tasting plates were given out, consisting of olive oil, basil, authentic Parmesan cheese, salami and some almond cake. We then were given some Moscato, Gewurztraminer, Brunello de Montalcino and Barbera d’Asti wine. The aromatic Gewurztraminer swamped the olive oil, but was delicious with the basil. The Salami could not stand up to the rich Brunello, but was divine with the Barbera, as was the Cheese. The expensive rich Brunello really needs something like meat to counterbalance it. The Moscato and the cake were a match made in Italian heaven. Some classic Italian Wine – Food pairings include Soave & Risotto; Amarone & Rabbit ; Chianti and Wild Boar ; Verdicchio and Sea Bass to name a few.

Lunch & Parisian Tiramsu

Italian Food

Italian Food

At this point, the little touches of food only made me realise that I was starving, and there was a very Italian lunch laid on, with some classic dishes. I went for two helpings of Lasagne and some Tiramisu. When I lived in Paris, there was a local Italian restaurant that had homemade Tiramisu ( in rue Claude Bernard ) and a guarantee that if it was not the best you ever tasted, you didn’t pay for it. All I can say is that I always paid for it, and will on my next visit. The Cork version was nice, but I can still taste that Paris one. Mind you, in Clonmel we are spoiled for Tiramisu. Both Catalapa and Befanis have delicious versions.

The famous @Grapes_of_Sloth aka Paul Kiernan

The famous @Grapes_of_Sloth aka Paul Kiernan

The Mighty Reds of Italy ( as opposed to Manchester )

Anyway, full up and weary, I still had to face the biggest challenge of the day. The rich reds which made Italy famous. It was obvious that the Italian Trade Commission were footing the bill because they really opened up some special bottles. Pinot Nero, Lagrein, Teroldego, Nebbiolo, Corvina, Rondinella, Molinara, Sangiovese, Brunello di Montalcino ( Sangiovese clone), Montepulciano, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Allianico, Negroamaro, Primitive Salento, Nero d’Avola and even that old favourite Cabernet Sauvignon were all on show. The superstar regions like Barolo, Barberesco, Chianti Classico and Brunello stood side by side with the Lagrein and Lunelli wines of Trentino / Alto Aldige. The feast finally came to an end and I came out of the tasting a lot more knowledgeable than when I went in. I think that is one of the things that I really like about wine. While you might hold some assumption of knowledge on a particular area or variety, but there is still so much more to learn. Humility and the lack of assumption are two traits that I have found invaluable as I search for new wines. For anyone who wants to try these different Italian varieties ( or the traditional classics ), we have a very good range in stock, at all price points. You are more than welcome to visit and taste. The Italians have a wonderful saying, and Fellini made a film based on the saying, “La Dolce Vita”. In these trying times, we all need a little of the sweet life.

Don’t forget to log onto the blog at www.rednosewine.com/blog or follow the ranting on Twitter – www.twitter.com/rednosewine

For anyone who would like more information and can’t make it into the shop, please feel free to contact me at info@rednosewine.com

“Life is much too short to drink bad wine”

Red Nose Wine Article - Nationalist May 27 2010

Red Nose Wine Article - Nationalist May 27 2010

Liberty Wine Tasting Feb2010

February 25th, 2010

I am back behind the desk after a very tiring jaunt to Dublin. I decided to kill two birds with one stone and stay overnight. Tuesday night saw a bit of smoozing among my MBA fraternity colleagues as we listened to Robbie Kelliher of Davys Stockbrokers wax lyrical about all things equity. Fascinating stuff, lots of value out there with anyone who has a few pounds – although fine wine is a far better investment. Little too many ‘what ifs’ for my liking in his speech. God help us all if interest rates rise before we are ready, and some economists argue that they have to. Robbie didn’t think so. I hope he is right. Before and after that, I did a tour of wine bars and restaurants to see how the big smoke enjoys a wonderful array of choice when it comes to their wine night out. Ely was great and so was Olesya’s Wine Bar on Exchequer Street. I was with my brother and the night wore on a bit, so after all the wine and the prospect of more the next day, I decided i needed to detox. So I had a lovely pint of Guinness.

pint of Guinness

On to the reason for the post – The Liberty Wines Portfolio Tasting. While i import a lot of my wines myself, and have to say much prefer this route, the reality is that you can’t be all things to all people, and I rely on other experts to prop up the list. Liberty are definelty one of the better ones out there, and they have a huge selection, and I think that we benefit greatly from the fact that they are UK based, as it offers us a choice we might not see otherwise. We had an Italian Tasting with them in December and it was a huge success.

It was great to meet Lar Veale of Sourgrapes.ie and The Sunday Tribune and Kevin Crowley of Fenns Quay Restaurant in Cork city. We have been tweeting for a while now. Lar kindly asked me for an interview and i made it onto his blog post. Kevin was also interviewed, but there were creative differences about the script, judging on the photo.

Lar and Kevin in debate over content of interview

I also got to meet some of the people behind some of our most popular wines.
The utterly charming Victoria Curatolo of Villa Tonino in Sicily.
Victoria Curatolo of Villa Tonino

I only started stocking Allegrini before Christmas but even at the higher price point, they are very popular. The La Grola and the Palazzo della Torre are great wines, but I finally got to taste the Amarone yesterday and it was really special. They also had the Corte Giara range which were really interesting as well, and at a better price point.

Silvia Allegrini shows off her Amarone

Silvia Allegrini

We sell a lot of Chianti and Sangiovese in general. It was great to chat to Giacomo Alari who is behind wines such as the great value Cantina De Montalcino Sangiovese di Toscana, Da Vinci Chianti,Chianti Classico and both the Rosso and Brunello di Montalcino.

Giacomo Alari

The other stand out wines for me were Domaine Nicolas Girard Sancerre – very different with all of the grassy notes you would expect from a Sancerre, but still a little bit of a change from the norm. Domaine Pfister’s Riesling was long, dry and delicious. There was a Cotes du Rhone called Domaine Richaud that was mind blowing, but at an RRP of €21.99, too expensive to sell. There was a Primitivo di Puglia that was really interesting at the price. The Costa della Sesia and Lessona from Sperino were great examples of both blended and pure Nebbiolo. The Innocent Bystander Pinot Noir really surprised me and offers good value. The Capezzana Olive Oil really finished off a wonderful days tasting.

A little video tour of proceedings …

As well as Lar, I also managed to bump into some other members of the Irish Wine press and it was great to talk with the men behind the words. Tomás Clancy of the Sunday Business Post told me a great story about his meeting with Robert Parker, whom I studied inside and out for my thesis. Unlike Tomás, I haven’t had the pleasure of meeting the man. It was also great to meet Kevin Ecock of the Free Running blog who gave me some good advice about the workings of the Irish Wine World.

Huge thanks to Gerry, Ben, David and the rest of the Liberty team who put on a great show. The lunch was delicious and the red wine Capezzana Barco Real, was one i stock as well, so great to see.

Icons of the World Stand Up

December 18th, 2009

It’s that time of year when we reflect on what’s gone before and we look forward to what’s on the way. Considering what has passed, may I quote the great Bob Dylan, “Let me forget about today until tomorrow”. Any by tomorrow I mean many years from now. Onwards and upwards and all of that type of positive sentiment. During the heady days of my youth when I was not as ‘sophisticated’ and insensitive to criticism as I am now, I used to read a little bit. Once I got used to the language I really enjoyed Shakespeare. I found it all very relevant to the modern world and that is probably why it is held up so high in literature. To quote the hip kids of the street, he was down with it. By writing this last sentence I have condemned myself to never having being in anyway hip. Well I don’t care and never have, so that probably makes me hip in a different sort of way – what do the hip kids think? Are they reading this article, do they read the blog or do they follow me on twitter? Maybe I am needy after all. Anyway, there is a famous speech in Henry V where the good king rallies the troops as they face almost certain death on the battlefield. His cousin Westmoreland had a moan about the situation and Henry launched into speech which by its end had made you feel sorry for anyone who wasn’t about to die in this battle. They would not have this chance at immortality. “We happy few, we band of brothers.. on St Crispin’s Day”… Some retailers might feel that this year has been one long St. Crispin’s Day, so that is why I suggest we look forward, not back. With that in mind, I will leave the best of the year lists to the papers and magazines. I will talk about wine, and in particular – very expensive iconic wines that most of us can never expect to taste, at least not this year. But once St. Crispin’s Day has passed and until that day shall come, I will give you an alternative that is affordable.

First up, the famous Chateau Pétrus. This is a wine from the right bank of Bordeaux and in particular the village of Pomerol. Considering all the bad press that Merlot gets, it is strange that one of the worlds most sought after wines is predominately Merlot. It is only 11 hectares in size and produces on average 2,500 cases per vintage. The wine has many fans, and sells for huge money. The current price in London for a bottle of 2005 is 2,800 sterling. I have held it in my hand but never tasted it. I have tasted its next door neighbours and hold a very good 2005 Pomerol from just down the road in the shop that sells for 26 euros. Alternatively, I have a very good Lalande de Pomerol for 19 that gives you the idea without the pricing. However, if you get invited to a party and they are serving Pétrus, don’t miss the chance.

Next up is Burgundy’s famous Pinot Noir, Romanee Conti – I covered this in a previous article but suffice to say, this is the one I want the most in my collection. I have a 1er Cru Nuits St Georges for 55 euros that gives you an idea of what to expect. This will be my Christmas dinner wine.

From Chateauneuf du Papes there is the famous Au Vieux Telegraphe or the new icon Clos du Papes. I have tasted these and even own a few bottles. Clos du Papes is owned by the Avril family who’s daughter is married to Bill Kelly of Kelly’s in Rosslare. For such an iconic wine, it is very reasonably priced. You can pick it up for about 55 to 60 euros a bottle. A very nice alternative is Bosquet des Papes which I sell on offer for Christmas for 24. Both are the traditional style wines and typical of the real authentic wines of centuries gone by.

Italian wines are less well known for iconic wines and vineyards, but more for iconic wine types and chief among them are Brunello di Montalcino, Amarone della Valpolicella and Barolo. These are very different wines from Tuscany, Veneto and Piedmont respectively. What they all share is a necessity for food and age if possible. At our recent Italian tasting, we had a huge response to the Amarone and it was easy to see why it won the Decanter World Wine Award Gold Medal, as did the Barolo. There are countless other icons from around the world and to list them all would be a book – in fact, many such books exist. I have a few of them in the shop if you want a peek.

The good news is that we are taking the excise duty off all wines immediately, even though the wines cleared customs at the top rate. Our little Christmas gift to you, and also, in the run up to Christmas we are open 7 days a week and will be opening many of the wines I have just mentioned. Come in and taste the difference. Thanks to everyone for reading the articles all year and especially for those of you who called in and ‘tasted the difference’. Remember, we deliver nationwide, so don’t get caught without good wine this Christmas. Log in or call in – you are more than welcome.

Don’t forget to log onto the blog at www.rednosewine.com/blog or follow the ranting on Twitter – www.twitter.com/rednosewine

For anyone who would like more information and can’t make it into the shop, please feel free to contact me at info@rednosewine.com

“Life is much too short to drink bad wine”

Red Nose Wine Article - Nationalist Dec 17 2009

Red Nose News – December 4th 2009

December 4th, 2009

Hello Wine Lovers

December is here and we are all allowed to spend our money on good wines regardless of the price :)
And then I awoke from the dream, and the recession was still upon us – agghhhh!!!!!!!!

Anyway, less rambling and more news… of which I have lots.

Last Saturday John Wilson of the Irish Times gave us a plug – our Italian Wine Tasting next Thursday to be precise. Great news indeed…. Interest has been great but there are still tickets available. First come first served. http://www.rednosewine.com/blog/index.php/2009/11/28/italian-tasting/

I am recommending wines at different levels, and here we go :

Under €10

Sensi Pinot Grigio @ €8.50 / bottle

€10 – €15

€12.50 –> Albaran : 40 % Cabernet Sauvignon , 25% Mourvèdre, 25% Syrah and 10% Alicante. 30 year old vines.

€15-€20

€15.50 @ La Source Vignelaure Red : 2nd wine of Chateau Vignelaure

over €20

On offer for ONLY €24 @ Bosquet des Papes “Tradition” Chateauneuf de Pape 2006

There are new wines on the special offer page of the website – valid in the shop as well of course

We have a great selection of corporate gifts available – call in for a brochure or click online to get it as well.

If you know any business’s that are doing corporate gifts and want maximum impact for minimum price – please keep us in mind.

We are also doing a tasting along with Pat Whelan of James Whelan Butchers in the Clonmel Park on Wednesday night as part of a cookery demo.

On Tuesday, I will be under the arches of the Clonmel Main Guard for the Clonmel Chamber / Tipperary Food Producers Network Christmas market.

And last but not least – the winner of the €250 case of wine from the New Zealand tasting is Kevin McAdoo – congratulations to Kevin.

Don’t forget – the next tasting is next Thursday – Italian Wine !!!!

Gary

Article – “Listen very Carefully, i shall say this only once”

December 3rd, 2009

“Listen very carefully, I shall say this only once”, whispered the attractive Resistance lady. I may have been on the cusp of adolescence and did not get all of the jokes, but I remember very clearly liking the accent. I am not sure if that is exactly when I started liking France or Europe because back in the 80’s it was difficult to look past the interest rates and the dole queues. However, these were my parent’s problems and I was still getting over seeing the Star Wars – Empire Strikes Back double bill in the Regal. I distinctly remember coming out of that with a sense of awe, but it was a million miles away from wine. In fact, it was a galaxy far, far away.

The BBC TV show ‘Allo Allo did offer something different and looking back now, I can see how the police man with the terrible accent telling Rene that he was “pissing by the window” was revolutionary in terms of what was allowed on TV. Economically they were bad times, but even the suggestion that there was a difference between the wine that you could technically physically consume ( you know the ones ) and wine that actually whispered in your ear as you drank it was considered strange. In many ways it still is. The times were dark but did we know any better – the French and the Italians were used to drinking the good stuff – wine is a staple and to this day there is no duty on it over there. The Irish, in general went to Tramore on holidays, not Nice. I do remember when a particular light came in to the country, and I am sure that it will come again. It was 1990 and the Irish soccer team found themselves among the best of the best in Italy for the World Cup. I’d like to tell you I went down there ( at the age of 16) and was introduced to the great wines of Italy, but I watched most of that world cup in a friends house in Toberaheena. My visits into Europe and the wine world came later. In fact, in terms of Italy, if I was to pinpoint the moment, it was in Capri, an island off Naples. There is a rich ( and trashy ) part and almost poor ( but much more real ) part of the island. In the later, there lies a section of beach at the end of a long dusty road and when you get there, “all” you have is a sunset, a lone bar/café and a beautiful beach. On my visit, Bob Marley sang on the stereo and my wife to be swam in the sea as I sat by the bar watching the sun set. There was a person diving into the sea from the high cliffs, and I told myself that I could do that if I wanted to. I just chose to have some wine instead, and this particular one was a Brunello di Montalcino and I can still remember it. Ironically, you should probably drink a wine like this with food, at night, when it is cold outside and not on a beach. It still tasted great though. The beach, the sunset and the swimmer definitely did help.

As we must, let’s jump back to the modern world and the harsh reality of floods, church scandals and economic ruin. Faith in the human and particular Irish, spirit must be sought in these times. If the church, government or the weather won’t test you, there will always be someone or something that will. The trick is to survive. That is not as always as easy as it might seem, and the pressures of the modern life should not be underestimated.

To help you along the way and to revisit a great time past, Red Nose Wine are having a very special tasting of Italian wine on December 10th in Nuala’s Café at the Westgate in Irishtown. I am hopeful that the Chianti, Montalcino, Barbera, Montepuliciano or whatever we open will drag us to sunnier climates, if only for a little bit. The Italians have a great outlook on life and outlive us to a large degree. They have their scandals and their politicians are interesting to say the least, but they have super wine. The high acidity of wines like Chianti ( or the Sangiovese grape ) matches perfectly with healthy tomato based meals. Not a great one to drink the day after a session though, as this acidity will make for an uncomfortable stomach. That’s why lighter wines (like Pinot Grigio) are great the day after. But let us not bemoan the hangover before we actually enjoy the wine. There is time enough for complaining. If difficulty faces you down, say as Rene would, “Tell him to pass off”, or dream of Naples like Officer Crabtree as he says,”See Niples and Do”. But as the budget approaches, I will l will leave the last word to Herr Flick of the Gestapo, as he answered the phone. “Flick, the Gestapo… No, I said FLICK, the Gestapo”.

Don’t forget to log onto the blog at www.rednosewine.com/blog or follow the ranting on Twitter – www.twitter.com/rednosewine

For anyone who would like more information and can’t make it into the shop, please feel free to contact me at info@rednosewine.com

“Life is much too short to drink bad wine”

Red-Nose-Wine-Article---Nationalist-Dec-3-2009

2 Great Tastings coming up

November 17th, 2009

Hello Wine Lovers

Just a quick one. Don’t forget the New Zealand tasting this Thursday November 19th @ 8pm.
We are just about sold out, but we will squeeze in 1 or 2 more.

However, we are also having a very special Italian tasting on December 10th – venue Nuala’s Cafe.
We will have some truely special wines open, from cheap and cheerful to stunning deep Red classics.

We might even get some food in for the evening… It will be close to Christmas. We all need a treat.

Latest Newspaper article – “Good wine for a good cause”

November 5th, 2009

“Good wine for a good cause” – Nationalist newspaper November 5th 2009

From time to time, I am awoken from my slumber and asked to do an informal tasting for a group. This can be a rowdy adventure with a group who heckle and shout their way through the tasting, like a recent experience I had in a local school. I hasten to add that it was with teachers that I held the tasting, not the students. Their mid term break had come and they were chomping at the bit. I tried to simultaneously manage a PowerPoint presentation and go through the range of wines we tasted. The questions and accusations flew and as the wines moved from light whites to rich reds, they really got going. I am not sure how much they learned about wine, but I definitely enjoyed the banter. The organiser sold tickets for the tasting and they raised some money for a local charity. I got my wines out to another group of people and sang my song of small family made wines. Everyone was a winner.

Charity was in the air in seems for I was also asked to participate in an evening for Cystic Fibrosis that was held in Barn Lodge on the eve of Halloween. It was billed as a coffee afternoon with wine. I drank coffee as I served and talked about wine. The charity is ‘tlc4cf’ which is trying to construct 5 treatment rooms at Limerick Regional Hospital. Caitriona Hayes from the Army Barracks in Clonmel is the Tipperary contact. They have a website with lots more information at www.tlc4cf.com. I arrived at about 4, where the team of hostesses were busy trying to manage the very punctual guests. Irish people do arrive exactly on time it seems. I set up some wine and I chatted with a few different people about the wines on offer. As the evening wore on, the wine was nearly gone, and I fully expected the organisers to be close to the end as well. These were tough ladies though, and the fight was still in them. I was grilled about this wine and that wine, and questions flew and I had to be quick on my feet. Chateau Kirwan was discussed in great length and Elaine claimed some form of family connection with the great Bordeaux estate. I was in no position to argue and hoped she might even manage to get me a discount since I buy the wine for the shop. I have heard since that the final figure raised was around €5,000, and a great evening was had by all and Caitriona and tlc4cf are a little closer to their goal in Limerick.

I met someone who reads the column last weekend ( it still surprises me to find out they do exist ), and he gave out to me. I should concentrate more on the wine and less about the ramblings around it, he told me. I think wine is as much about the people you drink it with, and where you drink it, as it is about the liquid in the glass. Hence, I like to wander into the edges a little, as opposed to stick to the main road. “We are all in the gutter”, said Oscar Wilde, “but some of us are staring at the stars”. However, I do listen from to time to time, so Billy, this is for you. Barolo is one of the great wines of the world. It is grown in Piedmont in northern Italy and the Nebbiolo is the grape used. In football terms, it is a Juventas fan, as Torino is very close by. As a region, it is like Burgundy, as small vineyards tended by different generations of the same family are the norm. Like many of the great wines of the world – Barolo needs time. While you can enjoy its raw power while young, it only starts to express itself after 10 years in bottle. This is the land of white truffles and like them; great Barolos are sought after, expensive and mystical. If any of you have started that list of things to do before you visit the great vineyard in the sky, can I suggest you add the following. Eat a white truffle omelette with a glass of 20 year old Barolo. I am sorry Billy. I started out trying to be factual, but ended up off on another tangent. I have a large collection of books filled to the brim on wine facts. Call in and we’ll open a nice bottle and we can go through the optimum maceration period for Merlot. If not, the website is now live and at www.rednosewine.com you can enjoy a huge amount of information about wine, both factual and mystical. You can also meet the many winemakers I talk about in the columns.

For anyone who would like more information and can’t make it into the shop, please feel free to contact me at info@rednosewine.com

“Life is much too short to drink bad wine”

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